Thursday, June 1, 2017

50CAN's Education Policy 101 Training Program

Laurie Kimbrel serves as the head of school for the Brookhaven Innovation Academy, a state-authorized and funded public charter school. There, her responsibilities include establishing the school’s instructional program and curriculum, as well as hiring staff and leading in staff development. Outside of her professional life, Laurie Kimbrel has volunteered with Students First, which has since merged with 50CAN.

50CAN strives to ensure that all children in the United States, regardless of location, have access to high-quality education. The organization offers multiple training courses to help achieve this goal, including an education policy course designed to help participants better understand and navigate policy-related issues.

50CAN’s Education Policy 101 course educates participants on the key policies that affect the education system for students in kindergarten through 12th grade. This research-based program comprehensively outlines policy at both the state and federal level, covering topics like finance, educational standards, teacher quality, and early childhood education. The program was created in partnership with the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. 

To learn more about 50CAN, their Education Policy 101 course, or other resources the organization offers educators, visit online at

Monday, February 27, 2017

Destiny’s Daughters of Promise - Girls to Women Symposium

A graduate of Loyola University in Chicago with a doctorate in curriculum and instruction, Laurie Kimbrel has held several leadership roles in education, including a position as superintendent of Tamalpais Union High School District in Larkspur, California. Outside of her current role as Brookhaven Innovation Academy's head of school in Norcross, Georgia, Laurie Kimbrel volunteers for Destiny’s Daughters of Promise.

Dedicated to helping teenage girls become strong leaders, Destiny’s Daughters of Promise will host its fifth annual Girls to Women Symposium at the Hilton Atlanta/Marietta Hotel and Conference Center in Marietta, Georgia, on May 6. The keynote speaker for the 2017 event will be Teya Ryan, president and chief executive officer of Georgia Public Broadcasting Media. 

The symposium will bring together some 50 professional women to serve as mentors and panelists and lead small group discussions with the girls. Destiny’s Daughters of Promise is accepting donations to fund the Girls to Women Symposium and is recruiting volunteers to serve as mentors to the teenage girls as they learn to become confident leaders. For more information, visit

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Prevent Puppies from Biting

Previously employed as the superintendent of Tamalpais Union High School District in Larkspur, California, Laurie Kimbrel is now the head of school for Brookhaven Innovation Academy in Norcross, Georgia. In her spare time, Laurie Kimbrel enjoys her hobby of dog training. 

One of the most important considerations in dog training is to manage and limit puppy biting habits. While puppy nipping and biting can seem cute and playful, it should be quickly put under control to avoid future problems.

When a young puppy is teething, its desire to sink its teeth into anything it encounters is both natural and healthy, but it is still necessary and easy to control this behavior even at this stage. It is best to start to train your young canine while it still has a tender mouth.

It is always good to consider regular dog behavioral training in such cases, as the principles are somewhat universal:

- Don’t hit a puppy in the face. This message is incomprehensible to a canine, and it may lead to worse problems in the future.

- Encourage good behavior and discourage unacceptable behavior (hint - biting is unacceptable).

- Never rough house or play tug of war with a puppy when training it not to bite, as this will increase its propensity to bite.

- Whatever method has been chosen to prevent biting must be used by any human being who has contact with the dog.

- Be consistent. The puppy must understand that biting is never allowed, and the owner must communicate this unequivocally.

- Biting can be an attempt by the puppy to assert dominance, and if allowed this will lead to bigger behavioral issues in the future. The human being must be in charge.

Friday, January 6, 2017

Large Dogs and Exercise

As the Head of School for the Brookhaven Innovation Academy charter school, Dr. Laurie Kimbrel’s responsibilities include hiring staff, establishing the school’s curriculum, and making sure the school complies with state requirements. Outside of her professional life, Laurie Kimbrel, EdD, contributes to rescue efforts on behalf of large dog breeds. 

Large dogs make great pets, but they often require more exercise than other breeds. Many large dog breeds, including collies, hounds, Labrador retrievers, and shepherds, were bred for active work like herding and hunting. Under these conditions, dogs got plenty of exercise through their regular daily activities. 

While your dog may not be herding any sheep, it still has the energy to do so. Factors such as age and health play a role in exactly how much exercise your dog needs, but many high-energy large breeds require up to two hours of daily exercise. 

Without enough exercise, your dog may not know how to handle their pent up energy. The dog might turn to destructive behavior as a means to relieve some of that energy. Aside from being bad for your furniture, lack of proper exercise can also be bad for your dog’s health, leading to obesity. 

If your dog does not have a yard to run around in for hours each day, you will have to compensate by going on long walks or trips to the dog park daily, helping to ensure your pooch remains healthy and your home stays in order.